Conference & Awards

2024 ACTWS & CSTWS Joint Conference

2024 Conference Program

***SOLD OUT***

If you’re interested in being added to our conference waitlist, please sign up here. If space opens up, we’ll reach out to you.

Conference Theme: Wildlife Research in Action

Wildlife research is the cornerstone of effective wildlife management, providing essential data and insights for informed decisions on species conservation, habitat preservation, and sustainable resource use. Researchers explore animal behavior, population dynamics, and ecological interactions, equipping wildlife managers to implement action that uphold ecological balance, biodiversity, and reduce human-wildlife conflicts.

Beyond understanding nature, this research actively guides policies that harmonize the demands of industries such as forestry, energy, and oil and gas, with ecological preservation. Through interdisciplinary collaboration and sound scientific evidence, it strikes a crucial balance between economic development and environmental stewardship, ensuring responsible resource management for the benefit of current and future generations, fostering coexistence between human activities and the vibrant wildlife within our ecosystems.

SCHEDULE HIGHLIGHTS

Thursday, March 7th:
Nerd Nite with guest speakers: Dr. Glynnis Hood, Dr. John Wilmshurt, and Eve Smeltzer. This will certainly be an event you won’t want to miss! 

Friday, March 8th:
Friday promises to be action-packed with a variety of hands-on events, featuring:

  • Field trip (10 am – 2 pm): Walk in the Park – Behind the Scenes with Jasper National Park. Featuring talks with ecologists from Aquatics, Wildlife Management, Ecological Integrity Monitoring, and Landscape Ecology.
  • Workshops: Wildlife Analytics Lab, Wildlife Acoustics, and a session by Niki Wilson on media communications.
  • Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion panel discussion and networking event.
  • Evening events: ACTWS AGM, student conclave, and mixer.
 
Saturday, March 9th:

The day will kick off with our keynote speakers, Lorne Fitch and Bill Snow, setting the tone for a day filled with presentations showcasing the latest advancements in wildlife research. The evening banquet promises a memorable experience, including the recognition of professional awards and student scholarships, silent and live auctions, and live music to end the day on a vibrant note. 

Sunday, March 10th:

The conference’s final day will start with a panel discussion on wildfire, featuring experts from academia, government, and forestry. Following this engaging session, attendees can look forward to a series of presentations, the CSTWS AGM, and the presentation of student awards for outstanding presentations.

Conference Program

The complete conference program is available above, but here are the concurrent sessions we’ve got planned for March 18:

  • Landscape disturbance
  • The birds and the bears
  • Methods in wildlife research and monitoring
  • Ungulates
  • Creatures of the night
  • Grasslands
  • Wildlife Disease

 

We’ve also got two panel discussions with pre-recorded presentations available for conference participants:

  • Human-wildlife conflict
  • Social science research and considerations in wildlife management
 
The whole day will be bookended by engaging opening and closing ceremonies that you won’t want to miss!
 
 
 

Conference Week Agenda

Although the main conference is on March 18, we’ve got events all week leading up to the big day. All of the below events are free to attend, even if you’re not attending the main conference on the 18th.

Committee Meetings

Full information and links to register.
Monday March 14 – Education and Outreach Committee (12-1pm)
Tuesday March 15 – Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Committee (1145am – 115pm)
Wednesday March 16 – Conservation Affairs Committee (1145a – 115pm)

Networking Events

Tuesday March 15 – Student and Pros Happy Hour (4-5pm). This is a great time to pick the brains of your fellow wildlifers for career advice and perspective. Whether you’re a pro or a student, we can all learn from each other. Sign up by emailing our student director, Phil, at [email protected].

Wednesday March 16 – Wildlife Jeopardy (7-8pm). Show off your mad wildlife skills and have a little fun. Grab a glass of your favourite beverage and your wildlife friends for an hour of wildlife trivia designed to pick your brain, make you laugh, and help you meet new people. Register here.

Annual General Meeting and Awards Ceremony

March 17, 4:30pm – 6:30pm

Our Annual General Meeting (AGM) is open to everyone with an interest in hearing what we’ve been up to in 2021 and what we have planned for 2022. This year, we’ll complete our AGM with our professional and student awards ceremony.  Details here.

Public talk and live auction

March 17, 7:30pm – 9:00 pm

Each year, we host a public talk that shares cutting edge research about Alberta wildlife. This year, we are so happy to have Dr. Jason Fisher sharing decades worth of work about wolverines from around the world. We know so little about wolverines and what we need to do to conserve them – or do we? Join us to find out!

This year, we’re also featuring Matt Besko in a live auction to kick start the evening. Matt will be auctioning off a trip exploring an Alberta trapline, two day passes for the Canmore folk festival, and a surprise item that will get you gleefully opening your wallets! All funds raised from the auction go towards student awards, supporting the next generation of wildlifers in Alberta.
Details and registration link here.

NERD NITE JASPER

March 7, 7:00-9:00 PM (doors open at 6:15), Jasper Legion, 400 Geikie St. 

Join us at Jasper’s first Nerd Nite, for an evening of wildlife talks from wildlife nerds. Guest speakers include: 

  1. Dr. Glynnis Hood – Beavers, more than just a great set of teeth. 
  2. Dr. John Wilmshurt – Humboldt’s Legacy and our disappearing grassland wilderness. 
  3. Eve Smeltzer – Primate politics: A story of dominance, coalitions, and coups

 

Secure your spot by registering HERE

Cost: $7

FIELD TRIP

Walk in the park: Behind the scenes with Jasper National Park ecologists

March 8, 2024, 10a.m. to 2p.m., meet at the Old Fort Point parking lot near Jasper.

This field trip will include a short walking tour of some locations of note near the Jasper townsite with Jasper National Park (JNP) ecologists from Aquatics, Wildlife Management, Ecological Integrity Monitoring, and Landscape Ecology. Our tour will include informal presentations and discussions of local wildlife topics and current wildlife issues within JNP.

Total walking distance is 5km along mostly flat terrain. Participants should dress for the weather and wear appropriate footwear for walking in winter conditions.

Participants will meet at the Old Fort Point parking lot, and after a stop by the Athabasca River to discuss fish species in JNP, the group will walk a trail towards Jasper Park Lodge, stopping again at Lac Beauvert to discuss wildfire, mountain pine beetle, prescribed burning in JNP, changes to vegetation and wildlife habitat, and issues around human-wildlife conflict situations resulting from wildlife viewing and photographers in the park. The group will continue to Jasper Park Lodge, stopping near the golf course to discuss wildlife attractants and additional human-wildlife conflict issues.

Around noon, the group will have a buffet lunch and warm up at Jasper Park Lodge.

After lunch, the group will walk back to the trailhead at Old Fort Point, with discussions of ongoing ecological integrity monitoring projects in JNP.

Facilitated by Parks Canada, Jasper National Park

 Cost: $40

** Sold Out**

If you are interested in being added to the waitlist, click HERE.

WORKSHOPS

Please click on the workshop poster to learn more.

Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Panelists

Please click on each panelist’s photo to read their bio.

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

Join us for an engaging discussion on the chapter’s activities over the past year and discover exciting plans for the upcoming year.

Date: Friday, March 8, 2024

Location: Forest Park Hotel, Jasper, AB

Time: 6:00 – 7:00 PM MST

We encourage all members to attend and actively participate in shaping the future of our chapter. Your insights and contributions are essential as we reflect on our achievements and set the course for the year ahead.

Thank you for your ongoing support, and we look forward to seeing you at the AGM!

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Research— Does It Make a Difference for Wildlife?

Presented by Lorne Fitch

Research is the unravelling, sometimes the solving of wildlife mysteries. We undertake research to discern how many critters are there, how many were there, what’s the trend, what are the connections and associations, how do things make a living, how do our human footprints and actions affect them and how do we bring them back from the brink.

As the theme of this conference is “Wildlife Research in Action” this address will spend some time discussing the “So What?” question. Bluntly put, does the additional knowledge created by research aid in biodiversity conservation?

Addressed will be the traction of research—how it is regarded, used to facilitate and inform changes to the way we manage wildlife and their habitats. Using examples and experience from several researchers, how long does it take to institute the results of research in conservation efforts and policy. What are some of the major impediments to research efforts being accepted and acted upon.

To what extent has research made, or will make a difference in conservation efforts. What are some of the factors to consider ensuring research efforts net better traction and have a demonstrable effect on wildlife conservation. How could practitioners and users of research results better position themselves for effective conservation efforts.

Presenter Bio: Lorne has been a biologist for over 50 years, working on many issues related to use of land and water. Lorne is a professional biologist, a retired provincial Fish and Wildlife biologist, was one of the co-founders of the stewardship initiative Cows and Fish and a former Adjunct Professor with the University of Calgary. Lethbridge is home, where he pens articles and essays on issues related to Alberta’s landscape and critters. This includes a recent book, Streams of Consequence- Dispatches from the Conservation World.

The Bison Cultural Study, From Reintroduction to Reconciliation

Presented by William (Bill) Snow

The Bison Cultural Study is about returning a culturally important species to a culturally important landscape. The Plains Bison, or Tatanga, is a part of our origin stories, our ceremonies, our understanding of the world; including its past, present and future. The Bison Cultural study utilizes an Indigenous methodology, “Biculturalism” and an Indigenous process, “Cultural Monitoring” to combine Western Science and Traditional Knowledge, to bring forward knowledge that will add to our current understanding Bison history, cultural significance, and management. In this time of climate change, we hope to reconnect a keystone species to its landscape, while restoring a fractured relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous groups, in a process that may lead to meaningful reconciliation.

Presenter Bio: William (Bill) Snow is a member of the Goodstoney First Nation of the Stoney Nakoda Nations, and is the Acting Director of Consultation at Stoney Tribal Administration. This work involves the assessment of industrial resource projects within Stoney Nakoda Traditional Territory, of Southern Alberta, that involve consultations with government and industry.

Bill is a graduate of the University of Lethbridge – Business Administration, and since 2012, Bill has been an advisor & presenter for the University of Alberta “Thinking Mountains” Conference, the “Mountains 101” online program, and Canadian Mountain Network initiative. In 2018, Bill became a “Director at Large” with Canadian Wildlife Federation, and is currently the Chair of the Indigenous Relations Committee. In 2022, Bill helped to complete the “Bison Cultural Study” that offers Traditional Knowledge regarding the Bison Reintroduction to Banff National Park, as well as the Bison Cultural Study video that was completed in 2023.

WILDFIRE PANELISTS

Please click on each panelist’s photo to read their bio.

Call for Papers and Posters

Deadline: 12 January 2024

You are invited to submit titles and abstracts for oral presentations and posters at the 2024 joint conference of the Alberta Chapter of The Wildlife Society and Canadian Section of The Wildlife Society. Presentations on all aspects of wildlife are welcome including ecology, management, research, monitoring, species biology, genetics, and new techniques.

The three types of presentations offered are:

  1. Traditional oral presentations – 12 minutes in length + 3 minutes for questions. Abstracts will be grouped into common themes and placed into concurrent sessions.
  2. Speed talks – 4 minutes in length.
  3. Poster – A poster session will be hosted on one day in the afternoon/evening for all conference participants.
 

The abstract submission form will ask you to specify your preferred talk format (e.g., traditional oral presentation, speed talk, or poster). While we endeavour to honour everyone’s requests, the Conference Planning Committee may ask you to deliver your presentation in a different format based on other abstracts submitted and conference organization. Your understanding and cooperation are appreciated.

Abstracts must include:

  1. Lead author name, affiliation, mailing address, phone number(s), and e-mail address
  2. Names and affiliations of additional authors
  3. Title of abstract
  4. Distillation of the purpose, methods, results and conclusions, 250 words max.
 

The abstract you submit will be the final version that is printed in the program booklet.

Please note: Authors will be advised of the final decision on their abstract by 2 February 2024.

Students: Monetary awards are available for all presentation types, posters, and travel to the conference. See details at Awards.

Join Us in Shaping Our Annual Conference: Call for Volunteers!

We’re excited to invite passionate individuals like you to join our team in planning our upcoming annual conference. This is a fantastic opportunity to be part of a dynamic group and make a significant impact on the success of our event.

We have a range of roles available, from planning captivating plenary sessions to coordinating memorable field trips and assisting in judging student presentations. Your unique skills and expertise can help shape an unforgettable conference experience for our members.

If you’re interested in getting involved and contributing to this event, please reach out to our Executive Director at [email protected], who will provide you with more details on available positions and how you can become an essential part of our conference planning team.

Conference Registration Rates

  • ACTWS/CSTWS Regular Member: $300
  • ACTWS/CSTWS Student Member: $180
  • Regular Non-Member: $350
  • Student Non-Member: $190

Notes:

A one-year regular Alberta Chapter of The Wildlife Society (ACTWS) membership is $20.76, and $5.42 for students. Please login or purchase a membership to obtain member registration rates.

If you are interested in becoming a Canadian Section of The Wildlife Society (CSTWS) member, a regular one-year membership is $20, and $10 for students. You can purchase your membership here

The primary cost associated with hosting our annual conference is catering. Your registration fee covers a package that includes five coffee/snack breaks over the weekend, as well as lunch, hors d’oeuvres, and dinner on Saturday.

Sponsorship Opportunities: Elevate Your Organization at Our Conference!

We are excited to invite your esteemed company to become a valued sponsor for our upcoming conference. Your support will not only help us deliver a successful event but also provide your organization with a unique platform for visibility and engagement with a diverse audience of industry professionals. We offer a variety of sponsorship packages to suit your needs and can tailor opportunities to align with your organization’s goals and values. 

Here are some key highlights of our conference sponsorship opportunities:

Tax Receipts for Donations: Your generous donation to our conference qualifies for tax benefits as per applicable tax regulations, allowing your organization to maximize its philanthropic impact while benefiting from tax deductions.

Complimentary Memberships and Registrations: Sponsors will receive complimentary memberships to our organizations, free conference registrations, and various other benefits tailored to meet your organizational goals.

Prominent Recognition: Sponsors will receive prominent recognition on our conference marketing materials, on our official conference website (www.actws.ca/conference), and during the conference, to ensure that your organization’s commitment to wildlife conservation reaches a broad and engaged audience.

Engagement Opportunities: You will have the opportunity to host live exhibitor booths, providing direct engagement with conference attendees, including wildlife professionals, students, and researchers from across Canada.

Student Scholarships: High-level sponsors will have the honor of personally rewarding well-deserving students with scholarships during the conference banquet, fostering the next generation of wildlife leaders.

To explore sponsorship options and discuss the benefits, please contact us at [email protected]. We look forward to the opportunity to work together and make this conference an outstanding success.

Rooted in Wisdom: Deer Aging Techniques

Embark on a journey of precision and insight with the Lethbridge College Wildlife Analytics Lab (WAL) at the ACTWS Conference in Jasper! Join our workshop, ‘Rooted in Wisdom: Deer Aging Techniques‘, to explore the secrets hidden within wildlife teeth. Explore both the field technique of ‘tooth eruption and wear’ and the laboratory marvel of ‘cementum analysis’ – both dedicated to unraveling the mysteries of ungulate ages. Delve into the heart of these techniques, comparing their accuracy and precision, with a revelation of the superior accuracy of cementum analysis. Learn the art of tooth extraction and witness the seamless process of submitting your own wildlife teeth to the WAL for aging through cementum analysis. Elevate your understanding of deer populations and contribute to the advancement of wildlife knowledge and bolster your resume with applied experience. Participants will gain hands-on familiarity with the field technique of jaw aging, and the lab process of tooth extraction, inspection, preparation, and cementum analysis. Join us in Jasper for a transformative experience at the intersection of field expertise and cutting-edge laboratory analysis!

Facilitated by the Wildlife Analytics Lab, Lethbridge College

Cost: $15.

Mastering Science Communications: Navigating Media Challenges and Amplifying Your Message

Are you ready to level-up your media chops? Even amid recent declines in public support for both science and science journalism, there are still many things we can do to make it more likely our science stories are told. In this 2.5 hour, interactive science communications workshop, we’ll discuss the current state of the media, and why talking to media matters. We’ll learn about current norms in the journalism process, and how to prepare so that your media interviews are accurate and memorable. We’ll practice personalizing our science stories to capture attention in a noisy, polarized media landscape.

Facilitated by Niki Wilson, a journalist, science communicator, and the winner of the 2023 ACTWS Outreach Award.

Cost: $25

Wildlife Acoustics Workshop: Turning Sound into Discovery

Sound analysis is becoming an increasingly valuable tool for biologists, environmental scientists, and land managers to survey and monitor wildlife populations. It is currently used for resource management, habitat health assessment, regulatory compliance goals, animal behavior studies, and documenting the effects of climate change worldwide.

Wildlife audio recorders provide a reliable, noninvasive, cost-effective, and unbiased means to meet these objectives.

At this one-hour hands-on workshop, learn how to set up and use a Song Meter Micro passive acoustic recorder to gain critical insights into your area of focus. By the end, you’ll see why biologists have deployed 150,000 Song Meter recorders in over 90 countries.

Facilitated by Wildlife Acoustics.

Cost: Free

Ashlyn Herron

Ashlyn Herron (She/Her)is a first-year Master of Science student at the University of North Dakota, where she is advised by Dr. Susan Felege (UND), and Dr. Andy Boyce, with the Smithsonian’s National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institution. She received her Bachelor of Ecosystem Management Degree from Lethbridge College in 2022.

Ashlyn’s passion for conserving grassland ecosystems has led her from her home in Alberta to the plains of North Dakota where she has been working to understand how birds respond to grassland restoration. As an international student, Ashlyn has been able to create a sense of place within North Dakota
through her connection with The Wildlife Society at both UND Chapter and the North Dakota State Chapter level and continues to advocate to increase inclusivity and bolster community.

Ashley Shaw, MES. (she/her)

Ashley is a first-generation Canadian currently residing on Treaty 6 territory in Edmonton, Alberta. Her parents are immigrants from Guyana, a country located in the Caribbean, and they have been fortunate to call Canada their home for over 30 years. Ashley is a blossoming outdoor adventurer, accompanied by her wonderful partner. Both are highly motivated by food, and he supports her in her various endeavors.

Ashley is an ecologist working in Indigenous rights and consultation, economic reconciliation, climate research, and environmental science. As her research takes her across the beautiful country of Canada, she has been consistently learning how to meaningfully incorporate diverse perspectives and knowledges into her work for the past 9 years. While her field of work may often be considered niche, Ashley is passionate about expanding the collective understanding of the practical implications of transdisciplinary research and multiple knowledge systems into effective decision-making processes for the general public and governing bodies.

Remington Bracher

Remington is a Cree scholar and is currently finishing his undergraduate Conservation Biology program at the University of Alberta; upon finishing his degree, he is continuing his studies as a graduate student at UBCO, where he plans on braiding Indigenous perspectives and knowledge into his research projects. Remington’s research focuses on wildlife harvest, treaty rights, food sovereignty, and the sociocultural benefits wildlife provides to Indigenous communities. Professionally, Remington works as a wildlife biologist for the Canadian Wildlife Service and is part of the priority species team as an Indigenous engagement specialist. For the past two years, Remington has served as the Student Director for ACTWS and is now the Education and Information Committee Chair. Throughout his tenure on the board, Remington took the lead in establishing the ACTWS Hunting Mentorship Program, which he hopes to integrate an Indigenous branch into the hunting program, aiming to assist Indigenous students in re-establishing connections with the land and culture through wildlife. Remington also serves as a coordinator for the Native Student Professional Development Program for TWS through the Native Peoples’ Wildlife Management Working Group. This program plays a crucial role in guiding Indigenous students in their early careers within the field of wildlife management by paying for 10-15 Indigenous students from across North America to attend the international TWS conference while providing a community for mentorship and development made up of Indigenous wildlife biologists, researchers, and policy experts from across North America.

Jane Park

Jane Park has been the Fire and Vegetation Specialist in Banff National Park located on the traditional territories of the Treaty 6, 7 and 8 First Nations and the Metis Nation homeland, since 2011. She started her career with Parks Canada in 2002 as a park warden for Banff National Park and has worked in various parks from Vuntut National Park (traditional territory of the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation) in the Yukon to Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve (traditional territory of the Haida Nation) on the northwest coast of BC. Her work in Banff focuses on the reintroduction of fire onto the landscape through prescribed fire, wildfire and fuel management, non-native and invasive vegetation management, and ecosystem restoration. She is also an Incident Commander on one of 5 Parks Canada National Incident Management teams. Her recent work also includes raising awareness of gender and diversity issues within Parks Canada and the broader wildland fire community in collaboration with colleagues in various other fire agencies.

Brook Skagen

Brook Skagen (B.Sc., P.Biol., ATT, AWB)  Pronouns: They/He

Brook Skagen is a passionate bird and plant nerd with a decade of experience in the environment field, working with industry, government, academia, and non-profit sectors throughout western Canada, with a particular focus on species at risk conservation. They are currently a Faculty Member with the School of Environmental Sciences at Lethbridge College, instructing courses in conservation biology, wildlife habitat management, and wildlife field techniques.

Growing up amidst the golden grasslands of southeastern Alberta sparked a keen interest in prairie ecosystems, shaping Brook’s dedication to grassland preservation throughout their career. They have made significant contributions to Alberta’s MULTISAR (MULTIple Species At Risk) program as both a wildlife biologist and member of the agrology team, working with landholders to protect these at-risk landscapes.

Beyond their technical roles, Brook has formerly assumed the role of Acting Editor for Nature Alberta Magazine, highlighting their commitment to disseminating environmental knowledge and story-writing to invoke a love for nature. Outside of their professional pursuits, Brook is a creator of art, music, and poetic writings, with the natural world as their muse.

Dr. Jen Beverly

Dr. Beverly is an Associate Professor at the University of Alberta. Her research team currently focuses on various aspects of wildfire risk assessment – with the overarching goal of providing decision makers with tools to ensure social and ecological systems thrive in fire-prone environments. She is a fire behaviour specialist and former helitack crew leader with firefighting experience obtained in multiple Canadian provinces, as well as Montana and Oregon.

Bob Mason

Bob Mason is a registered professional forester with more than 35 years of experience in sustainable forest management in Alberta, including senior roles in both forest management planning and woodlands operations.


Bob is Chief Forester for Canfor in Alberta where he oversees the Company’s corporate forestry activities in support of its Grande Prairie, Fox Creek and Whitecourt Divisions. He is responsible for ensuring long-term forest sustainability and maintenance of biological diversity across the company’s
forest tenures, as well as providing direction on the company’s engagement and relationship building with Indigenous communities, environmental certification programs and woodlands research initiatives. Bob also represents the company in joint industry-government work on legislation, policy, wildlife management and species at risk.

Bob holds a Bachelor of Science in Forestry from the University of Alberta. His extensive contributions to industry advancement include his current service on the board of directors of fRI Research, on committees of the Forest Products Association of Canada, the Alberta Forest Products Association, the National Council for Stream and Air Improvement, and fRI Research, and as Canfor’s representative on research and programming initiatives conducted in partnership with Ducks Unlimited Canada.

Bob and his wife Carole reside in St. Albert and enjoy spending time outdoors, camping, backpacking, cycling and snowshoeing.

Jane Park

Jane Park has been the Fire and Vegetation Specialist in Banff National Park located on the traditional territories of the Treaty 6, 7 and 8 First Nations and the Metis Nation homeland, since 2011. She started her career with Parks Canada in 2002 as a park warden for Banff National Park and has worked in various parks from Vuntut National Park (traditional territory of the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation) in the Yukon to Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve (traditional territory of the Haida Nation) on the northwest coast of BC. Her work in Banff focuses on the reintroduction of fire onto the landscape through prescribed fire, wildfire and fuel management, non-native and invasive vegetation management, and ecosystem restoration. She is also an Incident Commander on one of 5 Parks Canada National Incident Management teams. Her recent work also includes raising awareness of gender and diversity issues within Parks Canada and the broader wildland fire community in collaboration with colleagues in various other fire agencies.

Ken Greenway

Ken Greenway, following his Ph.D., dedicated approximately eight years of his career to applied research silviculture at the then Alberta Research Council. During this period, his primary focus revolved around examining aspen tree regeneration post-forest harvesting and the growth of aspen-white spruce mixedwood.

In 2003, Ken transitioned to the provincial government, assuming the role of a research scientist with a specialized focus on reforestation and regeneration systems. He played a pivotal role in leading the redevelopment of provincial reforestation standards. This transformation involved shifting from a system merely assessing site occupancy by trees to one that connects growth assumptions in forest management plans to an assessment of tree species occupancy, density, and growth.

By 2007, Ken took on a management role in reforestation, subsequently navigating through various areas of forest management responsibility. His journey included management roles in cross-ministry initiatives, along with a brief stint within the rural development space.

In November 2021, Ken assumed the acting role of Executive Director of the Forest Stewardship and Trade branch, securing the position permanently in 2022. His branch shoulders a wide range of responsibilities, spanning trade files such as the softwood lumber dispute with the US, timber dues rate setting and collection, forest tenure issuance, timber production auditing, and compliance monitoring. This involves ensuring harvesting rates align with approved amounts. Ken is actively involved in addressing forest health and adaptation, covering aspects like mountain pine beetle management and tree genetics standards. His role extends to forest management planning, contributing to regional and sub-regional land planning initiatives, as well as forestry data management.

PO BOX 4990
Edmonton AB
T6E 5G8


Rooted in Wisdom: Deer Aging Techniques

Embark on a journey of precision and insight with the Lethbridge College Wildlife Analytics Lab (WAL) at the ACTWS Conference in Jasper! Join our workshop, ‘Rooted in Wisdom: Deer Aging Techniques‘, to explore the secrets hidden within wildlife teeth. Explore both the field technique of ‘tooth eruption and wear’ and the laboratory marvel of ‘cementum analysis’ – both dedicated to unraveling the mysteries of ungulate ages. Delve into the heart of these techniques, comparing their accuracy and precision, with a revelation of the superior accuracy of cementum analysis. Learn the art of tooth extraction and witness the seamless process of submitting your own wildlife teeth to the WAL for aging through cementum analysis. Elevate your understanding of deer populations and contribute to the advancement of wildlife knowledge and bolster your resume with applied experience. Participants will gain hands-on familiarity with the field technique of jaw aging, and the lab process of tooth extraction, inspection, preparation, and cementum analysis. Join us in Jasper for a transformative experience at the intersection of field expertise and cutting-edge laboratory analysis!

Facilitated by the Wildlife Analytics Lab, Lethbridge College

Cost: $15

Professional refers to someone who works with wildlife and/or their habitats in a professional setting.

In this context, it is not in reference to a legal professional designation.

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